A Message to Anyone Dealing with Conflict

On January 5, 2021

There is no right or wrong way to think or feel while communicating with your spouse.  Exploring your future plans and concerns with the other person in the mediation room after years of misunderstanding and lack of support may sound like an overwhelming proposition.

However, I’ve found that practical solutions can be reached when people in mediation share what needs to be said, are validated by me in the process, and are then able to refocus on speaking their truth with peace of mind.

My role as mediator will shift as needed between grounding the conversation in the present and looking for ways to elevate participation beyond well worn patterns.

These discussions may feel raw, but they can lead to a more courteous exchange based on mutual understanding, or at least to a less stressful and more tolerable conversation. 

I’ve seen first-hand how mediation can positively transform spousal relationships and repair family discord. When it comes to deciding on a co-parenting strategy, mediation is often the key to moving forward and finalizing decisions that focus on the child’s best interests, happiness, and well-being.

At the end of our mediation, I’m hoping that you and your former spouse or partner will have a new-found recognition of each other’s needs and acquire the conflict-resolution tools you need to meet each other with fairness, honesty, and respect.

Embracing the mediation process can require a level of openness and honesty with yourself and with your former spouse or partner that may seem too taxing or unrealistic at the outset. Even though the journey may feel painful at times, considering everything that can be gained in the long term, it may prove to be worth it.

And remember, I will be there every step of the way.

Richard Brydson

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